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Old 07-07-2005, 03:01 PM   #1
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On this day in history. A Hanging in DC

The three men and one woman sentenced to death by a military tribunal for their role in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln are prepared for execution by hanging in Washington, D.C., on July 7, 1865. (AP Photo)
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Old 07-07-2005, 03:09 PM   #2
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and we still have the death penalty today! I agree with it, if you take a life on PURPOSE, then your life should be taken as well.
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Old 07-07-2005, 03:48 PM   #3
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I love all the info. from you. Tommorrow I want a nice write up of how the Liberty Bell was cracked.
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Old 07-07-2005, 04:39 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by SVupON1
and we still have the death penalty today! I agree with it, if you take a life on PURPOSE, then your life should be taken as well.
but I also think we should bring back public hangings!! That would help out the crime rate I'm sure!
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Old 07-07-2005, 04:43 PM   #5
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i think it should be an eye for an eye
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Old 07-07-2005, 04:52 PM   #6
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Old 07-07-2005, 04:56 PM   #7
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great minds think alike i guess
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Old 07-07-2005, 05:58 PM   #8
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i think it should be an eye for an eye
when I read this I thought of This...

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Old 07-07-2005, 08:04 PM   #9
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i think we should still have public hangings.. great thread bee..

With at least 7,538 known Pre-Furman executions, the South has executed more people than the rest of the county combined.

The first execution in what was going to become America was that of George Kendall, a Councilor in Jamestown Colony (now Virginia). He was convicted of Spying for Spain and was shot to death sometime on December 1, 1607. (According to the National Parks Service) . A mere 6 months after the colony was first settled.)

Virginia also claims the honor of executing the first female. Records state that Jane Champion was hanged some time in 1632, but no-one knows what her crime was. The next year, on June 24, 1633, Margaret Hatch was hanged for Murder in what is now James City County, Virginia.

The last Pre-Furman execution in the South was that of murderer William Bowen Jr. On January 15, 1965 he met his fate in the lap of "Big Yellow Mama", Alabama's electric chair, for a crime committed in Madison County.

The last Pre-Furman execution of a female in the South was that of 48-year-old murderess Rhonda Martin who also died in "Big Yellow Mama" on January 11, 1957 for a crime committed in Montgomery County, Alabama.

There are a known 7,538 known Pre-Furman executions in the South. 5,484 (72.8%) were Black and 1,748 (23.2%) were White. 212 of them were females, and of the females, 167 (78.8%) were Black.

In the 349 years from George Kendall to William Bowen Jr. there was an average of 21.6 executions per year.

The following is a racial breakdown of these executions.
White 1,748 23.2%
Black 5,484 72.8%
Nat. Amer. 91 1.2%
Hispanic 9 0.1%
Asian 1 0.01%
Unknown 205 2.7%

There were 5,138 Hangings, 2,135 Electrocutions, 232 Gas Chambers, 16 Shootings, 30 Burnt at the Stake, and 11 Breaking on the Wheel, 7 Hung in Chains (conventional hanging plus long term display of corpse), 6 Gibbeted (conventional hanging plus long term display of corpse), and 56 Unknown or Others.

These executions are the legal ones. There were thousands of cases of vigilantly justice, otherwise known as Lynchings.

Note: All executions cited below are Pre-Furman, occurring before 1968.
Counties mentioned may not have been in existence at the time of the crime.

Alabama Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on December 14, 1819.

Alabama has executed 708 people from 1812 to 1965.

2 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 706 since.

Eli Norman was the first person hanged in Alabama on December 19, 1812 for a murder committed in Madison County.

Patsy, a slave owned by Gorman, was the first female hanged on June 10, 1825 for murder committed in Perry County.

The last execution of a female in the South was that of 48-year-old murderess Rhonda Martin who died in "Big Yellow Mama" electric chair on January 11, 1957 for a crime committed in Montgomery County.

William Bowen Jr. was the last to die in the electric chair on January 15, 1965 for a murder committed in Madison County.

Hanging was the preferred method of execution until Horace DeVaughan died in the electric chair on April 8, 1927.

18 of the 708 people executed were women. all but the last 2 were Black.

The 708 executions works out to an average of 4.6 execution a year.

There were 554 Hangings, 153 Electrocutions, and 1Shooting.

Arkansas Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on June 15, 1836.

Arkansas has executed 477 people from 1820 to 1964.

2 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 475 since.

Thomas Dickinson was the first person hanged for murder in Arkansas sometime in 1820.

Lavinia Bernett was the first and only woman hanged for murder (Accessory to..?) on November 8, 1845. The crime was committed in Washington County. She was executed with her husband and son.

Charles Fields was the last person executed in Arkansas. For the crime of Rape committed in Jefferson County, he was electrocuted on January, 24, 1964.

Lee Simms Was the first to die in the electric chair on September 5, 1913. His crime was a Rape in Prairie County.

477 men and 1 woman have been executed in Arkansas.

This is an average of 3.3 execution a year.

There were 306 Hangings, 161 Electrocutions, and 4 Shooting.



Delaware Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on December 7, 1787.

Delaware has executed 62 people from 1662 to 1946.

10 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 52 since.

Turc, a slave, was the first executed in Delaware. He was hanged for Attempted Murder on January 19, 1662 in Sussex County.

Judith Roe was the 2nd executed and the first female hanged for murder on March 15, 1688. The crime was committed in Kent County.

May Carey, a White housewife,, was hanged for murder on June 7, 1935. The crime was committed in Sussex County. She was the last female executed.

Forrest Sturdivant was hanged on May 10, 1946 for a murder committed in Sussex County. His was the last execution.

Murderess Catharine Bevan, a White housewife, was the State's 3rd execution. She is also the only executee who was not hanged. In September of 1731 she was Burned at the Stake in New Castle County.

56 men and 6 women have been executed in Delaware. All but 1 of them were hangings.

This is an average of 1 execution every 4.6 years.

There were 61 Hangings and 1 Burning at the Stake.

Florida Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on March 3, 1845.

Florida has executed 314 people from 1827 to 1964.

7 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 307 since.

Florida's first execution was that of soldier Benjamin Donica who was hanged for murder on June 20, 1827 in Escambia County.

Although the Espy File doesn't list her, there is evidence that on September 22nd 1848 a slave, known only as Celia, became the first and only woman to be hanged in Florida. She was executed for the killing of her master, Jacob Bryan, whom she battered to death with a hoe. It has been suggested that Celia was Bryan's daughter. Richard Clark

Sie Dawson, a Black laborer, was electrocuted for Murder on May 12, 1964 in Gadsden County. His was the last.

All of the executions were hangings until Frank Johnson, a Black man, died in "Sparky" the State's electric chair on January 7, 1924. The Murder-Burglary occurred in Duval County.

This is an average of 2.3 executions a year.

There were 117 Hangings and 223 Electrocutions.

Georgia Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on January 2, 1788.

Georgia has executed 950 people from 1735 to 1964.

15 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 935 since.

Alice Riley, a White female indentured servant was Georgia's first execution. She was hanged for a murder in Chatham County on January 19, 1735.

The next day Richard White, a White male indentured servant was Georgia's first male execution. He was executed for the same crime.

Lena Baker, a Black domestic servant, was the last woman executed. For a murder in Randolph County, she was electrocuted on March 5, 1945.

Bernard Dye was the 950th and last person executed in Georgia. He died in the electric chair on January 16, 1964 for a murder in McDuffie County.

Jack, a slave owned by Lyford, was Burned at the Stake on September 20, 1774. Authorities deemed this an appropriate punishment for the crime of Arson.

Of the State's 950 executions, 15 were females. 10 or 11 of them were Black.

This is an average of 4.1 executions a year.

There were 530 Hangings, 431 Electrocutions, 1 Firing Squad and 2 Burned at the Stake.

Kentucky Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on June 1, 1792.

Kentucky has executed 424 people from 1780 to 1962.

5 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 419 since.

A man named Baysinger was the first Kentucky execution. He was hanged sometime in 1780 for a murder committed in Breckinridge County.

A female slave, Phoebe, owned by Rainey, was the first female executed. She was hanged sometime in 1808 for a murder committed in Garrard County.

A 13-year-old Black girl named Susan was the last female executed. She was hanged for murder on February 7, 1868 in Henry County.

Kelly Moss was the last man executed in Kentucky. He was electrocuted on March 2, 1962 for a murder in Henderson County.

On August 14, 1936, Rainey Bethea was hanged in Owensboro, Kentucky, before a crowd of 20,000. This was the last public execution in America. Kentucky adapted electrocution as the sole method of execution. In 1920, the rape of a 9-year-old girl by Will Lockett, a Black man resulted in the law being changed, allowing juries the option of sentencing a rapist to be hanged locally. The County Sheriff was in charge of these executions. Those convicted of murder had to be executed in the State's electric chair. Bethea had murdered a 70-year-old woman, Mrs. Edwards, but was tried for rape (so he could be hanged locally). Additionally, the fact that the Sheriff was a woman added to the attention the execution received.



Hanging was the only method of execution used until 18-year-old James Buckner was electrocuted on July 8, 1911. He committed murder in Marion County. From then until August, 1926 all executions were by electric chair. At that time the authorities determined that the electric chair was too good a punishment for a (Negro) rapist. They had to suffer the indignity of being hanged. After 9 hangings for Rape (8 of them being Blacks) in 1938 the law was changed, making the electric chair the only method of execution.

424 executions were performed in Kentucky. 12 of them were females.

This is an average of 2.3 executions a year.

There were 261 Hangings, 162 Electrocutions and 1 Unknown.

Louisiana Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on April 30, 1812.

Louisiana has executed 566 people from 1722 to 1961.

79 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 487 since.

The first person executed in Louisiana was a Black man who was Burned at the Stake sometime in 1722. His crime was murder in Orlean County.

The first woman executed was an unknown black slave who was the only person hanged after the Slave Revolt of 1730. Her 7 male co-conspirators were sentenced to Breaking on the Wheel, one of the cruelest methods of execution ever.

A very attractive prostitute, Toni Jo Henry, was the last woman electrocuted in Louisiana. She died on November 28, 1942 for a murder committed in Calcasieu Parrish.

The picture of Toni Jo in the condemned cell (above) is amazing - it is hard to believe that it was taken the morning of her execution or that she was allowed such apparently comfortable and relaxed surroundings. She was even allowed the company of a small black and white dog while awaiting execution. She said to the news cameraman who took the picture "I've smiled twice, Mister. Have you any idea how much talent is being wasted here today?" Richard Clark

The last execution was that of Jesse Ferguson, a Black man, was electrocuted for Murder-Robbery on June 9, 1961. The crime occurred in St. Landry Parrish.

A variety of execution methods were used until 1818 when hanging became the accepted standard. The electric chair was introduced with the electrocution of Eugene Johnson, a Black murderer, on September 11, 1941. The crime occurred in Livingston Parrish.

The electric chair was a mobile device which traveled from Parrish to Parrish. Some executions were even staged in the same courtroom as the convicting trial. In 1957 the electric chair found a home in Angola Prison. (The one famous for it's prisoner rodeo.)

Black teenage murderer Francis Willie was the only person in the nation to be electrocuted twice. On May 3, 1946, an improperly wired mobile electric chair gave him a less than lethal charge of electricity. After a battle in the courts to fight a 2nd execution, the Supreme Court decided that since the original sentence specified that he was to receive an electric current "until you are dead", Louisiana could electrocute him again. 0n May 9, 1947 he again sat in the same electric chair. Only this time the 17-year-old didn't walk away from it.

Of the 566 executions, 14 were women and 11 or 12 of these were Black women.

This is an average of 2.4 executions a year.

There were 506 Hangings, 86 Electrocutions, 6 Shootings, 1 Burned at the Stale, 11 Breaking on the Wheel and 41 Other/Unknown.

Maryland Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on April 28, 1788.

Maryland has executed 309 people from 1683 to 1961.

67 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 242 since.

Seaman Thomas Smith was the subject of Maryland's first execution. He was hanged for Piracy on June 20, 1683 in St. Marys County.

Rebecca Fowler, a housewife, was the 1st woman executed. She was hanged for Witchcraft on January 9, 1685 in Calvert County.

17-year-old Mary Wallis, a Black domestic servant, was the last female executed. She was hanged on February 10, 1871 for a murder in Prince Georges County.

33-year-old Nathaniel Lipscome, a Black man, was the last executed. He died in the gas chamber on June 9, 1961 for a Murder-Robbery in Montgomery County.

Hanging was Maryland's primary method of execution until Eddie Daniels, a Black laborer, died in the gas chamber on June 28, 1957.

Only 4 men died in Maryland's gas chamber.

309 people have been executed in Maryland, 11 of them were women

This is an average of 1.1 executions a year.

There were 297 Hangings, 4 Gas Chamber, 2 Shootings, 1 Burning at the Stake, 2 Hanged in Chains and 3 Other.

Mississippi Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on December 10, 1817.

Mississippi has executed 351 people from 1804 to 1964.

2 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 349 since.

Mississippi's first executions were the hangings of Wiley Harpe and James May on February 8, 1804. Conflicting evidence says the murder occurred in either Tishomingo County or Scott County

On March 2, 1833 an unknown female slave was hanged for an unknown crime in Pike County.

A female slave named Cicily was hanged for murder on May 22, 1850 in Tippah County.

Mildred Johnson, a Black woman, died in the electric chair on May 19, 1944 for a murder in Jefferson Davis County. She was the last female executed.

22-year-old Black farm hand Tim Jackson was the last executed in Mississippi. He died in the gas chamber on May 1, 1964 for a Murder-Rape in Madison County.

Hanging was the primary method of execution until Black murderer Willie Bragg died in the electric chair on January 11, 1940. The crime was committed in Jefferson Davis County.

Electrocution lasted until Gerald Gallego died in the gas chamber on March 3, 1955 for a murder committed in Forrest County.

351 people have been executed in Mississippi, 5 of them were women

This is an average of 2.2 executions a year.

There were 257 Hangings, 63 Electrocutions and 35 Gas Chambers.

North Carolina Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on November 21, 1789.

North Carolina has executed 784 people from 1726 to 1961.

127 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 657 since.

George Sennecca, a Native American, became the first executed when he was hanged for murder on August 26, 1726 for a crime committed in Chowan County.

Catherine Sullivan was the first female executed. She was hanged for an unknown crime on February 26, 1739. She was 1 of 6 people executed that day. The others were slaves hanged for an unknown crime in Chowan County.

19 year old Bessie Williams, a Black house maid, was convicted of Murder-Robbery and died in the gas chamber on December 29, 1944. She was the last female executed in North Carolina. The crime occurred in Mecklenberg County.

Black farm hand Theodore Boykin died in the gas chamber on January 27,1961 for a Murder-Rape-Robbery in Duplin County. He was the last person executed in North Carolina.

North Carolina's most famous executee is Thomas Dula, hanged on May 1, 1868 for the murder of Laura Foster. A ballad was written by a local poet, Thomas C. Land shortly after the execution. In the early 1960's the Kingston Trio's song "Hang Down Your Head, Tom Dooley" hit the top of the music record charts. The tale of Tom Dula is one of love, betrayal, and murder.

Hanging was the primary method of execution until Black rapist Walter Morrison died in the electric chair on March 18, 1910. The crime was committed in Robeson County.

Electrocution lasted until Allen Foster died in the gas chamber on January 24, 1936 for a murder committed in Hoke County.

Of the 784 people that have been executed in North Carolina, 18 of them were women

This is an average of 3.3 executions a year.

There were 421 Hangings, 166 Electrocutions, 194 by Gas Chamber, 9 Burning at the Stake and 1 Other.

South Carolina Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on May 23, 1788.

South Carolina has executed 641 people from 1718 to 1962.

80 to 88 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 553 to 561since.

Captain Stede Bonnet, Robert Tucker, Edward Robinson, Neil Patterson, William Scot, Job Bayley, John Smith, John Thomas, William Hewet, William Eddy, Alexander Annand, George Ross, George Dunkin, Mathew King, Daniel Perry, Henry Virgin, James Robbins, James Mullet, Thomas Price, John Lopez, and Zachariah Long were all hanged for Piracy on November 8, 1718 in Charleston.

Sarah Chamberlain was hanged for murder sometime in 1738 in Charleston, becoming South Carolina's first executed female.

The last woman executed was Rosa Stinette, a Black domestic worker. She was electrocuted on January 17, 1947 for a murder committed in Florence County.

On March 10th, 1865, seventeen year old Amy Spain, an African American, was hanged from a tree in the town of Darlington, South Carolina for treason and conduct unbecoming a slave. When she heard that the Union army was close at hand and would occupy the town she expressed her satisfaction by clasping her hands and exclaiming, "Bless the Lord the Yankees have come!" For her it should have meant the end of slavery, but the townsfolk saw it differently. Richard Clark

White Rapist Douglas Thorne was the last man executed in South Carolina's electric chair. He died on April 20, 1962 for a crime committed in Greenville County.

Hanging was the standard method of execution until William Reed, a Black man, was electrocuted for Attempted Rape on August 6, 1912. The crime was committed in Anderson County.

The youngest person executed in the 20th Century was a 14-year-old Black boy named George Stinney. On the afternoon of March 24, 1944, 2 White girls, Betty June Binnicker, age 11, and her friend , Mary Emma Thames, age 8, ran into George Stinney as they were looking for flowers to cut and bring home. Soon both girls were dead, beaten to death with a 14 inch railroad spike. After the bodies were discovered young George was arrested. He soon confessed to the crime telling police that he killed Mary Ellen because he wanted to have sex with Betty June, the older girl. He then killed Betty June because she wouldn't have sex with him. On April 24, 1944, after a 3 hour trial and a 10 minute deliberation by an all White jury, he was found guilty of Murder and Rape and sentenced to die in the electric chair. George Stinney was executed on June 16, 1944, less than 3 months after the murders. The crime occurred in Clarendon County.

The Espy File does not mention a slave uprising known as the Stono Rebellion. In 1739 authorities hanged about 40 slaves, whose severed heads were placed on mile markers in the colony. Their skulls remained on the posts for several years after the executions.

Well over 641 people have been executed in South Carolina, 16 of them were females.

This is an average of 2.6 executions a year.

There were 382 Hangings, 243 Electrocutions, 11 Burning at the Stake, 3 Gibbetted and 5 Unknown.

Tennessee Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on June 1, 1796.

Tennessee has executed 335 people from 1782 to 1960.

4 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 331 since.

Tennessee's first execution was that of 3 Horse Thieves. John Vann, Isaac Chote and William White were hanged on September 10, 1782 at an unknown location.

The first female executed was Molly, a slave owned by Holcolm, who was hanged for murder on March 20, 1807. Her crime was committed in Williamson County.

Eve Martin was the last woman executed. She was hanged for being an Accessory to Murder some time in 1820 for a crime committed in Hawkins County.

Black Rapist William Tines was the last man executed in Tennessee's electric chair. He died on November 7, 1960 for a crime committed in Roane County.

Hanging was the standard method of execution until Julius Morgan, a Black man, was electrocuted for Rape on July 13, 1916. The crime was committed in Dyer County.

335 people have been executed in Tennessee, 4 of them were females.

This is an average of 1.9 executions a year.

There were 208 Hangings, 125 Electrocutions, 1 Burning at the Stake and 1 Unknown.

Virginia Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on June 25, 1788.

Virginia has executed 1,277 people from 1608 to 1962.

275 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 1,002 since.

The first execution in what was going to become America was that of George Kendall, a Councilor in Jamestown Colony (now Virginia). He was convicted of Spying for Spain and was shot to death on December 1, 1607.

Virginia also claims the honor of executing the first female. Records state that Jane Champion was hanged some time in 1632, but no-one knows what her crime was. The next year, on June 24, 1633, Margaret Hatch was hanged for Murder in what is now James City County, Virginia.

Virginia Christian, a Black domestic servant, was electrocuted for murder on August 16, 1912 for a crime committed in Hampton City. She was the last of 88 females executed.

Carrol L. Garland, a Black man, was electrocuted for murder on March 2, 1962 for a crime committed in Lynchburg City. He was the last executed in Virginia.

Hanging was the accepted method of execution until Black Rapist Henry Smith died in the electric chair on January 13, 1908. His crime occurred in Portsmouth City

1,277 people have been executed in Virginia, 88 of them were females. Of the females, 76 of them were Black

This is an average of 3.6 executions a year.

There were 1,026 Hangings, 247 Electrocutions, 2 Shootings, 2 Burning at the Stake, 4 Hanged in Chains, 3 Gibbetted and 4 Unknown.

Washington DC Executions

The District of Columbia has executed 118 people from 1853 to 1957.

Daniel Woodward was Washington DC's first executee. He was hanged for murder on September 2, 1853.

Lincoln assassination conspirator Mary Surratt was the only woman executed in the District of Columbia. She was hanged with 3 co-conspirators on July 6, 1865. Mary is the one on the left in the photo below.

Robert Carter, a 28-year-old Black man , was the last person executed in the District of Columbia. He was electrocuted for murder on April 26, 1957.

Hanging was the only method of execution until Philip Jackson, a Black Rapist, was electrocuted on May 29, 1928.

Charles Guiteau was hanged on June 30, 1882 before a crowd of 4,000 who came to witness the execution of an assassin. On July 2, 1881 he had shot President James A. Garfield twice in the back. Garfield lingered on for months before he died Sept. 19.

During World War II a Military Tribunal found Nazi agents Herbert Haupt, Heinrich Heinck, Edward Keiling, Herman Neubauer, Richard Quirin and Werner Thiel guilty of Spying-Espionage. Their task was to blow up aluminum plants, railroad lines, canal locks, hydroelectric plants, and bridges. They all died in DC's electric chair on August 8, 1942.

118 people have been executed in in the District of Columbia.

This is an average of 1.1 executions a year.

There were 68 Hangings and 50 Electrocutions.

West Virginia Executions

The State was admitted into the Union on June 20, 1863.

West Virginia has executed 155 people from 1769 to 1959.

43 of these execution were prior to Statehood, 112 since.

West Virginia's first executions were that of Liverpoole, a male slave owned by Price, and Dolly, a female slave owned by Sands. They were Burned at the Stake for murder on July 28, 1769. The crime occurred in Jefferson County.

Lucy, a slave owned by Wells, was the last of 4 executed females. She was hanged for murder on September 28, 1832 in Tyler County.

The last execution was that of Elmer Bruner on April 3, 1959. He was electrocuted for Murder-Burglary in Cabell County.

Hanging was the accepted method of execution until Harry Burdette died in the electric chair on March 26, 1951. His crime occurred in Kanawha County.

155 people have been executed in West Virginia, 4 of them were females. All the females were Black

This is an average of 1 execution every 1.2 years.

There were 143 Hangings, 9 Electrocutions, 2 Burning at the Stake and 1 Hanged in Chains.

West Virginia is the only Southern State that doesn't have a current death penalty.

Note: All executions cited above are Pre-Furman, occurring before 1968.
Counties mentioned may not have been in existence at the time of the crime.
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Old 07-07-2005, 08:10 PM   #10
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Awesome artical there MP
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Old 07-08-2005, 09:50 AM   #11
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DAY-AM there MP...I didn't know your hobby was hanging...
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Old 07-08-2005, 05:21 PM   #12
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i think he just took ur job
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Old 07-08-2005, 05:30 PM   #13
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I wish we had hangings now-a-days. We need to put some fear in the criminals. They get a few years vaction in the pen and go back to what they were doing before. If you steal somthing, chop their hands off, they wont steal again. If they do, chop the other one off then the cant....
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Old 07-09-2005, 02:02 PM   #14
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Good idea Twisty!
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