What exactly is CE rated armor? - TwoWheelForum: Motorcycle and Sportbike forums
 
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-24-2008, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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What exactly is CE rated armor?

I have seen it mentioned as an option in the back of many jackets and it seems standard in the arms and elbows of many jackets as well. Can I just get a bit of clarity as to what exactly it is and what the CE rating means? Should I be looking for the back piece when ordering my riding jacket?

Thanks as usual
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-24-2008, 11:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pootiestang View Post
I have seen it mentioned as an option in the back of many jackets and it seems standard in the arms and elbows of many jackets as well. Can I just get a bit of clarity as to what exactly it is and what the CE rating means? Should I be looking for the back piece when ordering my riding jacket?

Thanks as usual
Its the good stuff. IF its CE rated it means you can use it for trackdays everywhere n racing.

Prolly be 3 days b4 you get to read this tho.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-24-2008, 11:58 PM
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CE is kinda like Snell I think... Just a way to show that it's good chit...


I recommened buying a back protector seperately cause the ones for the pockets inside your jacket suck...
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-25-2008, 12:04 PM
 
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CE is a European safety certification agency that comes up with safety standards for a lot of things other than impact armor. You'd see CE certification symbols on electrical motors and etc. as well.
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-25-2008, 01:42 PM
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Here is a pic of some. It just slips into pockets in the shoulders, elbows, and back of your jacket. I hardly even notice its there so its not uncomfortable at all.

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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-25-2008, 02:03 PM
 
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[QUOTE=
I recommened buying a back protector seperately cause the ones for the pockets inside your jacket suck...[/QUOTE]


agreed. i have an icon leather jacket and the padding on the back is pretty lame. Lots of choices for extra back protection out there. i purchases one of the icon field vests, fits under or over my jacket.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-25-2008, 02:04 PM Thread Starter
 
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Excellent information! Thanks everyone!
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-25-2008, 06:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fnfalman View Post
CE is a European safety certification agency that comes up with safety standards for a lot of things other than impact armor. You'd see CE certification symbols on electrical motors and etc. as well.
Ah... Kinda like Underwriters Laboratories...
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-26-2008, 02:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pootiestang View Post
I have seen it mentioned as an option in the back of many jackets and it seems standard in the arms and elbows of many jackets as well. Can I just get a bit of clarity as to what exactly it is and what the CE rating means? Should I be looking for the back piece when ordering my riding jacket?

Thanks as usual
Here's the long and short of it all...

Back protectors are often included in the standard complement of armor and many jackets allow a back protector to be installed. Because of the more delicate nature of the spinal column, back protectors require that lower levels of force be transmitted. However, in the Cambridge Standard for Motorcyclists Clothing, Roderick Woods asserts that the majority of spinal injuries are caused by blows to the hip and shoulders. In the rare circumstance that a motorcyclist received a direct blow to the back the damage would be unmitigatable by armor.

Although Cambridge may not endorse back protectors, it is quite obvious that some protection is better than none at all, and there is a CE standard for back protectors: - European Standard EN 1621-2:2003. To summarize the basics: -

Motorcyclists’ back protectors are impact tested with a bar-shaped impactor designed to represent the hazards of impacts with edges such as curbstones. The back protector is mounted on a steel anvil which has a load cell underneath it to record the amount of force against time.

The impactor is dropped from a height that gives it an impact energy of 50 joules.

Level 1 protectors: The average peak force recorded below the anvil in the tests shall be below 18 kN, and no single value shall exceed 24 kN.

Level 2 protectors: The average peak force recorded below the anvil in the tests shall be below 9 kN, and no single value shall exceed 12 kN.

There is however, no mention of hyperextension/hyperflexion restraint (aka whiplash, but can include the whole spine), or of torsional restraint (torsional injuries can result from the afore-mentioned blows to hips or shoulders).

This is the area where designs featuring hard armour could potentially be better than the softer types.

One potential cause of injury that should be born in mind is the contents of any bag or rucksack worn by the rider.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-26-2008, 02:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Toy Store View Post
Here's the long and short of it all...

Back protectors are often included in the standard complement of armor and many jackets allow a back protector to be installed. Because of the more delicate nature of the spinal column, back protectors require that lower levels of force be transmitted. However, in the Cambridge Standard for Motorcyclists Clothing, Roderick Woods asserts that the majority of spinal injuries are caused by blows to the hip and shoulders. In the rare circumstance that a motorcyclist received a direct blow to the back the damage would be unmitigatable by armor.

Although Cambridge may not endorse back protectors, it is quite obvious that some protection is better than none at all, and there is a CE standard for back protectors: - European Standard EN 1621-2:2003. To summarize the basics: -

Motorcyclists’ back protectors are impact tested with a bar-shaped impactor designed to represent the hazards of impacts with edges such as curbstones. The back protector is mounted on a steel anvil which has a load cell underneath it to record the amount of force against time.

The impactor is dropped from a height that gives it an impact energy of 50 joules.

Level 1 protectors: The average peak force recorded below the anvil in the tests shall be below 18 kN, and no single value shall exceed 24 kN.

Level 2 protectors: The average peak force recorded below the anvil in the tests shall be below 9 kN, and no single value shall exceed 12 kN.

There is however, no mention of hyperextension/hyperflexion restraint (aka whiplash, but can include the whole spine), or of torsional restraint (torsional injuries can result from the afore-mentioned blows to hips or shoulders).

This is the area where designs featuring hard armour could potentially be better than the softer types.

One potential cause of injury that should be born in mind is the contents of any bag or rucksack worn by the rider.
Awesome post. Thank you.
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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-26-2008, 02:13 PM
 
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There's also a level 3/ 100 joules, that is usually reserved for the heigher-end units. The problem though, is that many of the manufacturers don't know what level their selling- they most likely buy their armor from knox and haven't a clue.
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 09-13-2011, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toy Store View Post
There's also a level 3/ 100 joules, that is usually reserved for the heigher-end units. The problem though, is that many of the manufacturers don't know what level their selling- they most likely buy their armor from knox and haven't a clue.

This user simply copied and pasted from the Wikipedia article on motorcycle armor. The article itself is devoid of proper sources in many cases, and makes no mention of level 3 armor which is what a lot of the jackets that are currently on the market are touted as having.

Take it with a grain of salt.
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