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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-18-2006, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
 
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Tire Mounted Backwards

A local shop mounted my front tire against the direction of rotation. I didnt notice it until I was making the repairs after the low-side. Does anyone know if the tire rotating in the wrong direction would have contributed to the lowside? Does rotation effect traction or is it a wear issue? I want to know as much as possible about why the tire is marked for rotation direction before I confront the store owner/manager. Thanks.
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 04:35 AM
 
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Sorry to hear about your crash. Someone here will know a little more about your question...



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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 06:48 AM
 
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Yes, it could affect traction...at least on wet pavement. The lines in the tire are designed to "push" water out, away from the center of the tire.

I had a dealer mount my front tire backwards...Birdman caught it and had a pretty good laugh...

I mean it's not like there is an arrow on the tire showing the direction of rotation or anything...
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 08:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
Yes, it could affect traction...at least on wet pavement. The lines in the tire are designed to "push" water out, away from the center of the tire
For street use it would affect your traction, especially on wet roads. If you were on a track…it wouldn’t have much affect. Guy’s/Gal’s flip the direction on their tires all the time on the track to get more use out of them.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 08:04 AM
 
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Rotational arrows are there because of the way that the tread splice is put into place. Use on a track or in high speed situation can result in belt separation (on bias tires) and you'd have no real grounds for coming back at the manufacturer for faulty product.

The reading I've done indicates its about optimal performance mostly, especially true in cars. On a bike I just wouldn't risk it and get them properly put in. After all, if you lose one tire, you're hosed.

Here's a nice thread on the subject and a choice quote:
Quote:
"As to bias ply tires ... the direction of rotation indicated by the arrow means that as the tire rotates its contact patch will, with EACH revolution, cross from a higher (outside) belt to a lower (inside) belt for each belt juncture along the circumference. That puts NO separation stress on the junctures. Had the tire crossed from lower to higher bias there would be separation stress imposed on the juncture with each and every rotation. The amount of stress is trivial in most cases and would not CAUSE the belts to separate. BUT, if for any other reason the belts began to separate this rotation stress at the contact patch would immediately cause it to become catastrophic. (Rotation caused stress tries to WIDEN the separation if rotating in the wrong direction and tries to close any separation if rotating in the proper direction.)

"Also as an aside, most radial tires are NOT uni-directional. However, as to motorcycle tires, even radials may have a rotation direction arrow stamped on its sidewall and should be mounted accordingly. This, because tread patterns were designed to take advantage of the direction of rotation, not because of bias belt orientation. Clearly in these cases it is not a concern about belt separation.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 01:13 PM
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with most that it is mostly a wet traction issue but could contribute to dry traction if passing through some dirt/sand on the road way. I dought you could ever hold the installer responsible but I would make them remount it when you put the bike back on the road.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 02:37 PM
 
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with most that it is mostly a wet traction issue but could contribute to dry traction if passing through some dirt/sand on the road way. I dought you could ever hold the installer responsible but I would make them remount it when you put the bike back on the road.

Besides the pure enjoyment you will get when you get to the manager at the dealer's. You might even get a few freebies...
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 05:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JB0813 View Post
A local shop mounted my front tire against the direction of rotation. I didnt notice it until I was making the repairs after the low-side. Does anyone know if the tire rotating in the wrong direction would have contributed to the lowside? Does rotation effect traction or is it a wear issue? I want to know as much as possible about why the tire is marked for rotation direction before I confront the store owner/manager. Thanks.
The direction on the tyres is to do with the layering of belts inside the tyre, as correctly pointed out by Kanswitch. The tread pattern is designed to work in a specific direction, but the effect isn't that great.

It may be of interest to you that several of my Bucket Racing colleagues run front tyres from larger bikes on thier rear wheels. The signifigance of the direction of rotation is that the belt layers are done in such a way as to better deal with the forces upon the tyre i.e. the front tyre has the most force applied to it during braking, whereas the rear has the most force applied during accelleration, So with that in mind, it make sense, if you're running a front tyre on your rear wheel, to put it on backwards.
Our local Bridgestone distributor has stated that "any distributor who puts tyres specifically marked as fronts, on a rear wheel, will be subject to legal action"and as such has refused to supply tyres where he knows this will be the case (which has caused a little bad blood within our ranks).

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-19-2006, 05:46 PM
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i dont think that will be an issuse in the states, we will always love a fatty out back



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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-20-2006, 05:55 AM
 
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i dont think that will be an issuse in the states, we will always love a fatty out back




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