Why Use Nitrogen In Your Tires? - TwoWheelForum: Motorcycle and Sportbike forums
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Why Use Nitrogen In Your Tires?

Well after reading the large # of tire questions out there and most recently the ones on flats and OTB's great post about checking tire pressures I thought that I would throw another "Tip" out there... I fill my tires with Nitrogen instead of regular air from an air compressor. I work in the automotive industry and see up to a thousand cars a week. I will bet $100.00 that on any given day I could check the air pressure in every tire on every car and find that 70% of all tires have incorrect air pressure... Tires loose air naturally through the rubber and also around the bead area over time due to oxidation around the rim caused by water in air lines. Here is some information that I think most of you will find informative.

Nitrogen is used in Nascar tires because they heat up and cool down often and this usually causes moisture to form in the tires thus causing more of an inconsistant tire pressures.


Nitrogen--an inert, noncombustible, nonflammable and noncorrosive gas--has been used as a tire inflatant for years in commercial and military aircraft, space shuttle transport vehicles, race cars, earthmoving and mining equipment, and other applications where tires are subject to unusual stress. With the UltraFill system, nitrogen is now practical, cost-effective, and easy to use at the retail level.

According to the Department of Transportation, roughly 80 percent of this nation's vehicles have tires that are underinflated. The UltraFill system addresses this somewhat unrecognized, but serious, underinflation issue which impacts tire life, fuel mileage, and road handling.

Longer Tire Life
Nitrogen is a superior tire inflatant because it diffuses through tire rubber 30-40 percent slower than air. As a result, proper tire pressure is maintained for a much longer period of time. Properly inflated tires maintain the correct footprint on the road, which minimizes squirm and rapid tire wear. Nitrogen further extends tire life because it is a clean, moisture-free gas which significantly reduces internal tire oxidation and wheel corrosion caused by wet and oily compressed air. An improvement of only five percent in tire life for the vehicles on the road today would also have a positive impact on the environment--resulting in at least 10 million fewer tires to dispose of per year.

Better Fuel Mileage
Drivers can get better fuel mileage with properly inflated tires which roll better than underinflated ones, reducing fuel consumption by up to 10 percent and decreasing auto emissions. Nitrogen-filled tires also could significantly reduce the two million gallons of gasoline the U.S. Department of Energy says are lost every day due to low tire pressure.

This next part is more in reference to car tires but hey unfortunately we all have to cage it occasionally.

Improved Road Handling
Properly inflated tires corner better than underinflated ones on wet or icy roads. And the spare tire, inflated with nitrogen, will better retain its pressure for an emergency situation.


Nitrogen molocules are larger then oxygen so it escapes through the tires slower thus providing more stable inflation.



Other information on this topic here.......

http://theforcethat.blogspot.com/200...for-tires.html
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:05 PM
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Ya know, there was a commercial on TV yesterday for a tire place that was hyping up the fact that they fill all the tires with nitrogen... I kinda assumed that was the advantage... Very interesting.
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:09 PM
 
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I wonder if i could use the spare nitrogen tanks i have from the paintballing days to fill my tires.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:09 PM
 
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Who has nitrogen fill stations?
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:09 PM
 
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interesting... so where do you get the Nitrogen at?
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:09 PM
 
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Well if i can pay.50 for it and be on my way then im all for it....LOL
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:10 PM
 
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I wonder if i could use the spare nitrogen tanks i have from the paintballing days to fill my tires.
What kind of markers do you have?
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:12 PM
 
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paintball stores. welding supply places i believe. various other companies like scuba shops and such.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by onesickpsycho View Post
Ya know, there was a commercial on TV yesterday for a tire place that was hyping up the fact that they fill all the tires with nitrogen... I kinda assumed that was the advantage... Very interesting.
The two companies that I have worked for over the past 11 years don't use it and all that they would need to invest in is a machine that takes the regular air in the atmosphere and seperates out the nitrogen in the air....

I filled my tires with air to my usual pressures and then went to a tire shop a mile from my house. (i didn't fill them with nitrogen yet) I then took a ride down the highway at 65 mph and made sure to not vary my speeds. after hitting a cloverleaf and u-turning back to the garage I started at I checked my air pressures and found that when I got back to the shop the tires were warm to the touch and the inflation had risen due to the heated air in the tire. when air gets hot the molocules are spread apart and expand causing pressure to rise.. then when it cooled it dropped back to where it started from. NOW THE FIRST FILL took the same route at the same speeds and found that the inflation was more constant almost exactly where it was when I started. So I figure to prolong tire life and have a more stable feel due to less fluctuation in tire pressures when riding it is worth the few dollars it costs to pay for a nitrogen fill... I mean come on gas here in MA today is $2.70 a gallon for regular $2.80 for midgrade and $2.90 for premium.... Not to mention CAM2 is like $9.00 a gallon........but that is a topic for another day.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:21 PM Thread Starter
 
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Who has nitrogen fill stations?
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Originally Posted by ebbs15 View Post
interesting... so where do you get the Nitrogen at?
Some tire shops and also some diving shops have it... just call around to some of the shops in the area....

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Well if i can pay.50 for it and be on my way then im all for it....LOL
more like $2-5 to fill both tires.... still worth it if it helps get you longer tire life......

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What kind of markers do you have?
let's keep the to a minimum
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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TATER View Post
The two companies that I have worked for over the past 11 years don't use it and all that they would need to invest in is a machine that takes the regular air in the atmosphere and seperates out the nitrogen in the air....

I filled my tires with air to my usual pressures and then went to a tire shop a mile from my house. (i didn't fill them with nitrogen yet) I then took a ride down the highway at 65 mph and made sure to not vary my speeds. after hitting a cloverleaf and u-turning back to the garage I started at I checked my air pressures and found that when I got back to the shop the tires were warm to the touch and the inflation had risen due to the heated air in the tire. when air gets hot the molocules are spread apart and expand causing pressure to rise.. then when it cooled it dropped back to where it started from. NOW THE FIRST FILL took the same route at the same speeds and found that the inflation was more constant almost exactly where it was when I started. So I figure to prolong tire life and have a more stable feel due to less fluctuation in tire pressures when riding it is worth the few dollars it costs to pay for a nitrogen fill... I mean come on gas here in MA today is $2.70 a gallon for regular $2.80 for midgrade and $2.90 for premium.... Not to mention CAM2 is like $9.00 a gallon........but that is a topic for another day.
I thought the recomended air pressure took the warming of the tires in to account... that's why it says for example on my tires... 42psi (COLD)
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
 
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I thought the recomended air pressure took the warming of the tires in to account... that's why it says for example on my tires... 42psi (COLD)

Correct... that is most likeley the max pressure recomendation..... even the regular recomended presure (probably around 28-33) is when cold... so I go about 2 lbs higher and don't have to worry about the squishier feel when it is really cold outside...

"NITROGEN DOES NOT MAKE YOUR TIRES STICKIER IN ANY WAY SO DON'T GO OUT AND HIT THE TWISTIES ON COLD TIRES BECAUSE THE RUBBER STILL NEEDS TO BE HEATED TO GET SOFT AND STICKY"
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:35 PM
 
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I have an old Sears compressor in my garage that I use to fill the air in all my vehicles. I can check them cold and can use the compressor for other things. Anyway, air is composed of about 21 percent oxygen and 78 percent nitrogen.
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-15-2007, 11:40 PM Thread Starter
 
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I have an old Sears compressor in my garage that I use to fill the air in all my vehicles. I can check them cold and can use the compressor for other things. Anyway, air is composed of about 21 percent oxygen and 78 percent nitrogen.


This is just what I do... air has worked since the invention of the Tubeless tire but I prefer to take it a tiny step farther .... to me the cost benefit analysis and PITA factor are so minor it is worth it to me to use nitrogen.

as long as the compressor is bled properly and little to no condensation is being pumped into tires there is nothing wrong with good old air.... I hate gas station air because a lot of their compressors are not bled of moisture often and you can sometimes see water dripping from the air hose where it connects to the air chuck fitting...
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 12:04 AM
 
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The humidity in Denver can get down to single digits so you don't have to worry much about moisture here.
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 12:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TATER View Post
This is just what I do... air has worked since the invention of the Tubeless tire but I prefer to take it a tiny step farther .... to me the cost benefit analysis and PITA factor are so minor it is worth it to me to use nitrogen.

as long as the compressor is bled properly and little to no condensation is being pumped into tires there is nothing wrong with good old air.... I hate gas station air because a lot of their compressors are not bled of moisture often and you can sometimes see water dripping from the air hose where it connects to the air chuck fitting...

How do you bleed a compressor. I bought a huge compressor from my cousin.



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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 01:37 AM Thread Starter
 
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How do you bleed a compressor. I bought a huge compressor from my cousin.
most have a levder or a small wingnut valve... the bigger ones have air water seperators with a little valve on the bottom....
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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-16-2007, 06:49 AM
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You should bleed your compressor at least once a month! Turn it on... get the pressure on the tank up to the normal 100-120#. Turn it off. Spin loose the bleeder screw on the bottom. Most of the time they are left handed threads... opposite... righty loosey...

Crank it open... let all the air pressure drain out... might take a few mins. You should see water and maybe brown water come out of it... re-tighten/close it. REPEAT at least once more!

Then close it and your done.

As far as where to get the nitrogen.... almost any auto tire store... BelleTire or Dicount Tire should have it.




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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-18-2007, 08:54 PM
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Hum food for thought.....
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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-19-2007, 06:28 PM
 
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agreed all.

yes nitrogen will stay in the rubber longer, but i think the initial advantage was that its dry. And easier to get than true dry air. No moisture means less affected by heat. consistent tire pressures as said above.

also, it seems to be the norm to run green valve caps when running nitrogen. dunno where it started.
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