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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this is for the people who have taken the "Beginner MSF Course". Can anyone tell me what it actually entails? The place that I'm taking it at has a schedule as follows:

Day one: 6pm - 9pm (classroom learning)
Day two: 7am - 12pm (bike riding)
Day three: 7am - 3 pm (bike riding/classroom learning)

I understand that but I'm looking for more of a description. One of my friends told me that they have you watch a movie about like bike accidents that people have gotten into. He said it was like really horrible and half the people in the class wanted out once they saw this. Is this true for any of you?

Grafixx
 

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i dont remember a movie like that. initially it was very basic and is geared toward someone that has no knowledge of how to operate a motorcyclye and it takes you through controls, cornering, braking, safety manuevers and so forth.
 

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The basic course will be two days (at least the ones here are), each day split in half between riding and classroom time typically. They will teach you everything about the bike as if you've never seen one before. How to use the clutch, choke, blinkers, how to brake turn, etc. They provide the bikes as well, typically something like a Rebel 250.

You will learn the laws of the street, basic philosophies of riding in traffic, etc.

Everything you learn in MSF is something you should continue to practice for as long as you're riding. You'll hear about people that have been riding for 20 years that take MSF and end up learning things.

I took the Basic class and 6 months later for the hell of it took my bike back and did the Advanced Class. That one is only a day, and many drills are the same, but you can't learn too much.

Check out Keith Code's books Twist of the Wrist 1 and 2. A lot of it pertains to road racing, however, they're pretty extensive in describing how a bike handles and why it does what it does. The main thing is overcoming your instincts b/c a lot of times when things get hairy, what you want to do is not the best thing to do. For instance, getting out of the throttle in a turn.

Good luck. . you also get an insurance break when you pass. :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses everyone. Pigface, I appreciate all your advice. It seems like we're posting right after one another. Kinda funny but I honestly do appreciate all the advice and insight.

Thanks again everyone :dthumb: ,

Grafixx
 

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Up here (WA) it is a 3 day (really more like 2 1/2):

Day 1: Classroom, learning about various techniques and mindset(s) you need for riding on the street safely. This covers a workbook and instructional video, much like the instructional videos we all "enjoyed" :smash: in school. There weren't any "graphic" videos or anything like that for us. (4 hrs)

Day 2: Meet at course and spend the day working on actual bike skills on the bikes. Quick reviews with a coach after you complete each exercise to see what you did right and what you can improve. Repeat until they move to next exercise. (6hrs) Return to classroom, review workbook and info from Day 1. Take written test, receive results, review missed questions for everyone. (up to 2hrs, depending on how long test completion takes)

Day 3: Meet at course and spend the first part of the day completeing additional exercises that were not covered on Day 2, repeating some exercises from Day 1 for additional practice. (4-5hrs) Take driving test. 3 - 4hrs.

One of the greatest things about this class, for me, was the group aspect of it. You are working as a group in the classroom and it made it really easy to trasition to helping each other out on the course. Watch what you are doing and identify what works and what doesn't. Then you can help the other riders out that may be having problems with a particular exercise.

My :2cents: anyhow :)
 

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Sorry to kind of hijack the thread, but how soon before you get a bike should you take the course? I plan on getting a bike in the fall or winter, to start riding next spring, but with my class schedule the way its going to have to be I won't have time to take it during the school year. Would taking it this summer be too soon??
 

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Grafixx01 said:
Thanks for the responses everyone. Pigface, I appreciate all your advice. It seems like we're posting right after one another. Kinda funny but I honestly do appreciate all the advice and insight.

Thanks again everyone :dthumb: ,

Grafixx
You're welcome, I appreciated when people helped me with this stuff when I was starting. Plus, I gotta make my rounds to all the sites and get my post count up. :lol:
 

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wombat7 said:
Sorry to kind of hijack the thread, but how soon before you get a bike should you take the course? I plan on getting a bike in the fall or winter, to start riding next spring, but with my class schedule the way its going to have to be I won't have time to take it during the school year. Would taking it this summer be too soon??
Take it whenever you want to take it, but personally I wouldn't buy a bike until taking it. You may find that riding isn't something for you, or you may learn something that will sway you towards a completely different kind of bike. So, I wouldn't think it would be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm in agreeance with PigFace. That's what I'm doing. Taking the course and then buying the bike. I didn't buy any gear or anything. I just want to take the class and see if it is for me although I've been wanting a bike since I was like 9. We'll see if I can get the hang of everything. If I can, I'll probably buy the bike, tow it home and then ride it in the church and school parking lots along with around the neighborhood roads to familiarize myself with it, it's handling and everything else.

G
 

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Graff...you'll be fine...

I can't tell you about anything on the basic MSF... I took the advanced back in the day... 8 or 10hrs all in one day...

But either way, you'll be fine... but get the gear... the crazy stuff can happen even if your trying to be carefull.

If you are truely worried, take the MSF, then buy the gear and then the bike!

GEAR SHOULD ALWAYS BE FIRST!
 
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