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This is a good read for those that think they "know it all". While this doesn't give you any techniques, I feel it sheds some light on an all-to-familiar subject. The basic premise is that you need to take your time and actually learn to ride. Don't go out and buy the biggest and baddest just because it's there. Take your time and learn to ride right.

http://www.svrider.com/articles/2000apr_story4.htm
 

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Been there done that... so there is way too much reading for me. Besides, I already agree with that premise so I don't need to be convienced!
 

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Gas Man said:
Been there done that... so there is way too much reading for me. Besides, I already agree with that premise so I don't need to be convienced!
:iagree: ...for possibly different reasons.

I think for every newb like myself, and undoubtedly for the squids, there is a point when you scream "ENOUGH!". That is to say "I get it already". I realize as a motorcyclist I will always be learning, but there are so many other skills that are the same way. Art, musicianship, driving, culinary skills, etc. Motorcycling is a skill as well, that you continually have to develop. In all my years as an artist, professionally & teaching, I've never seen the amount of bludgeoning from the experienced about how inexperienced newcomers are.

I realize it's a poor comparison, lives are rarely endangered while learning new cords or notes or whatever. But the basic analogy is sound. Online I constantly read of some wizened sage imparting "Kung Fu" like advice about starting with .025CC bikes and eventually after a few decades you can ride a 600, ...maybe. No squid is going to give this individual the time of day, if anything it inspires them to ride faster on the streets with the biggest sportbike they can find.

Riding on a track is about control, like the writer said. Riding on the streets at excessive speeds is about the loss of control, & revelling about riding that edge. Lots of riders are just in it for that thrill, and have little desire to perfect their skills.

I notice the writer pointed out how he schooled the new street riders that thought they were all that, but did he give them any credit for going to these track sessions? Seemed someone wanted a chance to toot his own horn. I myself am waiting till I acquire my year + of experience so I can attend my first race school. The race school emphasizes that many riders have no intention of being track racers, but are street riders who wish to improve their abilities. Maybe that's what some of those riders were doing there.

He did recognize that some of us newbies do want to improve, and respect riding. I think the number of newbies like us from peer pressure from squids & from 'sages' who will brow beat anyone they don't respect, dwindle in number.

The irony of this of course is that this is mainly an online thing. In person, I've yet to meet someone who sat there and talked down to you about whether or not you're riding a bike you can handle. Quite the opposite, they readily toss out advice more geared towards handling the bike you've already chosen. Show a desire to just listen & learn, and I haven't come across anyone condescending yet.

If anything I often hear that I need to just get out there MORE often & just ride. Learn all I can about my bike, and know when not to push myself.

Sorry if I got off track or missed the point. It's just that I've joined two other forums, and one seemed to go over the top about new riders. I sometimes think these articles & rants push it, and instead have the opposite effect of what they hoped for. One of the reasons I come to Two Wheel so often, is that it isn't judgemental or preachy. Instead it's been a constant source of helpful info, with plenty of encouragement to get out there & ride.
 

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JayMax :iagree:
The writer makes a valid point about riders not knowing how to ride properly. He does also toot his horn quit a bit tho.
I consider my self as a seasoned rider. I have schooled a many a rider on much better bikes while at the track and on the street. I had one come to me one day and ask how I was able to constantly pass and stay infront of him, while I was on a 600 and he had a 1000. I explained that I had chosen better line through the corners and was able to give 100% acceleration while he was still trying to point and shot.
The next session I told him to follow me for a few laps and see if it helped. He did and buy the end of the day, I had to work to get the 600 buy the bigger 1000.
I met him again later that summer at a different track. I couldn't keep up at all unless we where in the tight section.
He actually thanked me for showing him that there will always be something to learn.
My wife cant understand why I keep taking schools for ridding after my years of experience. I have never left a school with out learning something + its fun!
 

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JayMax said:
I know, I know! :lol:

Also Jeeps, you're exactly the kind of rider that newbs want to hear from. "Less preachin' & more teachin'!"
As you may know I love the sport and love to talk shop.
The guy is actually older than me and wanted some advise.
As for the preaching.
Most of the slower yung'ens don't want to talk. When I was a yung'en and found a faster rider, I wanted to know why and would talk and ask questions all the time. I didn't matter if they were older or younger than me. Most would be happy to help. A few would just shrug me off. I don't know if they thought I was to slow to ever learn or they were to good to help or maybe just didn't know and where ridding on pure luck.
If I see you screwing up and think I might be able to help. I try to. If you listen, is up to you. I don't consider myself an expert rider by no means but, I do have quit a few miles on and off the track under my belt.
 
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